UConn student gets Medicaid; Cooley defamation suit dismissed

It was a GOOD week for…

Health care controversy, after a third-year law student was criticized by conservative commentators for receiving Medicaid. Brendan Mahoney, a student at the University of Connecticut School of Law, used to pay for a high-premium health care plan offered by his law school. During his third year, Mahoney decided to shop around and discovered that since he only worked part time during the academic year and summer, he qualified for Medicaid. Connecticut is one state which adopted the Medicaid expansion, making it possible for more residents to receive medical insurance through Medicaid. “No one needs to justify why they are seeking coverage under the Affordable Care Act,” Mahoney responded to the critiques in an op-ed in the Hartford Courant. Mahoney said health care was a fundamental right, and was happy to have the opportunity to receive dependable coverage through Medicaid.

It was a BAD week for…

Retribution, after a judge dismissed Thomas M. Cooley Law School’s defamation lawsuit against a New York law firm. Cooley Law School had sued the firm, Kurzon Strauss, for making  defamatory statements while the firm was seeking clients to sue the Michigan school. The law firm stated that the law school “grossly inflates its post-graduate employment and salary information” and “schools like Thomas Cooley will continue to defraud unwitting students unless held civically accountable.” Kurzon Strauss sued Cooley Law School, but a federal trial court dismissed that lawsuit. Cooley Law School then hoped to win its defamation suit, but a U.S. District Court judge dismissed it because the school failed to prove that Kurzon Strauss used “actual malice” to defame the school. The lead attorney had relied on news reports, blogs and other sources for his accusations. Cooley Law School plans to appeal the ruling.